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Ian Wright
Ian Wright

English for a Changing World Level 1 Student Book: A Beginner's Guide to Global Issues, Culture, Science, Technology, and Personal Development


English for a Changing World Level 1 Student Book: A Review




English for a Changing World is a six-level course that aims to develop learners' language skills and prepare them for the challenges of the 21st century. The course covers a wide range of topics related to global issues, culture, science, technology, and personal development. In this article, I will review the Level 1 Student Book, which is designed for beginners who have some basic knowledge of English. I will examine the content and structure, methodology and approach, and evaluation and recommendation of the book.




English For A Changing World Level 1 Student Book.pdf


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Introduction




What is English for a Changing World?




English for a Changing World is a course that was published by Scott Foresman in 1984. It was written by Ronald Wardhaugh, a professor of linguistics and applied linguistics at the University of Toronto. The course consists of six levels: Level 1 (Part A and Part B), Level 2 (Part A and Part B), Level 3 (Part A and Part B), Level 4 (Part A and Part B), Level 5 (Part A and Part B), and Level 6 (Part A and Part B). Each level has a student book, a teacher's guide, an audio cassette, and a workbook. The course is intended for learners who want to improve their English skills for academic, professional, or personal purposes.


Who is the author?




Ronald Wardhaugh is a renowned linguist who has written many books and articles on various aspects of language and linguistics. He has taught at several universities in Canada, the United States, and Australia. He has also been involved in language teaching and testing projects in different countries. He has a special interest in sociolinguistics, which is the study of how language relates to society and culture. He has written several books on this topic, such as An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (1992), Languages in Competition (1999), Proper English (1998), and Understanding English Grammar (2002).


What are the main features of the book?




The Level 1 Student Book has several features that make it appealing and effective for learners. Some of these features are:


  • It has 20 units that cover topics such as greetings, introductions, family, hobbies, food, weather, time, directions, shopping, health, travel, education, work, sports, entertainment, environment, communication, technology, culture, and values.



  • It has colorful illustrations and photographs that support the text and stimulate interest.



  • It has clear objectives and instructions that guide learners through each unit.



  • It has varied activities that practice all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.



  • It has review sections that consolidate what learners have learned in each unit.



  • It has self-evaluation checklists that help learners monitor their progress and identify their strengths and weaknesses.



  • It has a glossary that explains the meaning and pronunciation of key words and phrases.



  • It has a grammar reference that summarizes the main grammatical points covered in each unit.



Content and Structure




How is the book organized?




The book is organized into 20 units, each of which has four parts: A, B, C, and D. Each part has a different focus and function:


  • Part A introduces the topic and the vocabulary of the unit. It also presents a dialogue or a text that models the language and the situation of the unit. It also has a listening activity that checks comprehension and a speaking activity that practices pronunciation and fluency.



  • Part B focuses on grammar and structure. It explains and illustrates the main grammatical points of the unit. It also has exercises that practice the form and use of the grammar.



  • Part C develops reading and writing skills. It presents a reading text that relates to the topic and the language of the unit. It also has questions that check comprehension and develop critical thinking. It also has a writing activity that practices the genre and the purpose of the unit.



  • Part D integrates all four skills in a communicative task. It provides a situation and a role for learners to perform in pairs or groups. It also has tips and suggestions that help learners prepare and perform the task.



What are the topics covered in each unit?




The topics covered in each unit are relevant and interesting for learners. They reflect the themes and issues of the modern world, as well as the personal experiences and interests of learners. Here is a list of the topics covered in each unit:


  • Greetings and Introductions: Learners learn how to greet people, introduce themselves, and exchange basic information.



  • Family: Learners learn how to talk about their family members, their relationships, and their occupations.



  • Hobbies: Learners learn how to talk about their hobbies, their preferences, and their reasons for liking or disliking something.



  • Food: Learners learn how to talk about food, their eating habits, and their opinions about different kinds of food.



  • Weather: Learners learn how to talk about weather, seasons, temperature, and activities related to weather.



  • Time: Learners learn how to tell time, ask for time, and talk about daily routines.



  • Directions: Learners learn how to ask for and give directions, describe locations, and use prepositions of place.



  • Shopping: Learners learn how to shop for clothes, ask for prices, sizes, colors, and make comparisons.



  • Health: Learners learn how to talk about health problems, symptoms, remedies, and advice.



  • Travel: Learners learn how to talk about travel plans, destinations, transportation, accommodation, and attractions.



  • Education: Learners learn how to talk about education systems, subjects, teachers, students, and goals.



  • Work: Learners learn how to talk about work situations, occupations, skills, responsibilities, and satisfaction.



  • Sports: Learners learn how to talk about sports, rules, equipment, players, teams, and results.



  • Entertainment: Learners learn how to talk about entertainment options, preferences, opinions, and recommendations.



  • Environment: Learners learn how to talk about environmental issues, causes, effects, solutions, and actions.



  • Communication: Learners learn how to talk about communication methods, devices, advantages, disadvantages, and etiquette.



  • Technology: Learners learn how to talk about technology products, features, functions, uses, and trends.



  • Culture: Learners learn how to talk about culture aspects, differences, similarities, and values.



  • Values: Learners learn how to talk about values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors.



How are the skills integrated in each unit?




The skills are integrated in each unit in a way that reflects the natural use of language in real-life situations. The skills are not taught in isolation but rather in connection with each other. For example:



  • In Part A of each unit, the listening skill is used to understand the dialogue or text that introduces the topic and the vocabulary of the unit. The speaking skill is used to practice the pronunciation and the fluency of the language and to interact with other learners.



  • In Part B of each unit, ```html to understand and apply the main grammatical points of the unit. The exercises practice the form and use of the grammar in meaningful contexts.



  • In Part C of each unit, the reading skill is used to comprehend and analyze the reading text that relates to the topic and the language of the unit. The writing skill is used to produce a text that practices the genre and the purpose of the unit.



  • In Part D of each unit, all four skills are integrated in a communicative task that simulates a real-life situation. The task requires learners to use the language and the skills they have learned in the unit to achieve a specific goal.



Methodology and Approach




What is the pedagogical approach of the book?




The book adopts a communicative approach that emphasizes the use of language for meaningful communication and interaction. The book also incorporates elements of other approaches, such as:


  • A functional approach that focuses on the functions and purposes of language, such as expressing opinions, making requests, giving advice, etc.



  • A situational approach that provides authentic and realistic contexts for language use, such as shopping, traveling, working, etc.



  • A learner-centered approach that takes into account the needs, interests, and preferences of learners, and encourages them to participate actively and autonomously in their learning process.



  • A cooperative approach that fosters collaboration and cooperation among learners, and promotes positive interdependence and social skills.



  • A cross-cultural approach that exposes learners to different cultures and perspectives, and develops their intercultural awareness and competence.



How does the book cater to different learning styles and needs?




The book caters to different learning styles and needs by providing a variety of activities and materials that appeal to different types of learners. For example: